Sharply Moving Towards Sunset

Bits and Pieces, Odds and Ends, and everything in between
the-uncensored-she:

girl-non-grata:

mensrightsactivism:

A Voice For Men, one of the most prominent men’s rights websites out there, advocates for women who are being sexually harassed to “envision the person talking to [them] as human” and to thank them.
The new civil rights movement has truly arrived.

Ladies, even though you’ve just been dehumanized in public, you should “envision the person [sexually harassing] you as human” and afford them the human respect that they’ve just denied you.
I’m honestly terrified at the mental trickery it takes to actually believe stuff like this: that a man’s “new civil rights” entails the sexual harassment of women; that men are simultaneously uncontrollable sexual animals and the only real human beings in this scenario.
It’s beyond mere irony. The blog avoiceformen dot com has base levels of internalized sexism that border on psychotic self-delusion. And, ladies, these men are walking the streets with you.

All potential predators and all misogynists.

Damn. Only the deluded could ever think that saying thank you to harassment is the correct response. I can’t even take MRAs seriously anymore. Like I just have to assume that anyone spouting MRA nonsense is a performance artist that is choosing a bad topic for their creative impulses. That is the only way I can explain these people’s existence anymore, it’s that far from sanity. Either that or they are modern day ironic clowns that don’t want to go the extra mile and don a clown outfit.

the-uncensored-she:

girl-non-grata:

mensrightsactivism:

A Voice For Men, one of the most prominent men’s rights websites out there, advocates for women who are being sexually harassed to “envision the person talking to [them] as human” and to thank them.

The new civil rights movement has truly arrived.

Ladies, even though you’ve just been dehumanized in public, you should “envision the person [sexually harassing] you as human” and afford them the human respect that they’ve just denied you.

I’m honestly terrified at the mental trickery it takes to actually believe stuff like this: that a man’s “new civil rights” entails the sexual harassment of women; that men are simultaneously uncontrollable sexual animals and the only real human beings in this scenario.

It’s beyond mere irony. The blog avoiceformen dot com has base levels of internalized sexism that border on psychotic self-delusion. And, ladies, these men are walking the streets with you.

All potential predators and all misogynists.

Damn. Only the deluded could ever think that saying thank you to harassment is the correct response. I can’t even take MRAs seriously anymore. Like I just have to assume that anyone spouting MRA nonsense is a performance artist that is choosing a bad topic for their creative impulses. That is the only way I can explain these people’s existence anymore, it’s that far from sanity. Either that or they are modern day ironic clowns that don’t want to go the extra mile and don a clown outfit.

(Source: avoiceformen.com, via whatispatriarchy)

beatonna:

hydrogeneportfolio:

Minimal Posters - Six Women Who Changed Science. And The World.

Yeah yeaaa, lemme go back in time and put these posters on my wall when I was 10!

Thanks sethasfishman for showing me this!

neuromorphogenesis:

How Language Seems To Shape One’s View Of The World

Lera Boroditsky once did a simple experiment: She asked people to close their eyes and point southeast. A room of distinguished professors in the U.S. pointed in almost every possible direction, whereas 5-year-old Australian aboriginal girls always got it right.

She says the difference lies in language. Boroditsky, an associate professor of cognitive science at the University of California, San Diego, says the Australian aboriginal language doesn’t use words like left or right. It uses compass points, so they say things like “that girl to the east of you is my sister.”

If you want to learn another language and become fluent, you may have to change the way you behave in small but sometimes significant ways, specifically how you sort things into categories and what you notice.

Researchers are starting to study how those changes happen, says Aneta Pavlenko, a professor of applied linguistics at Temple University. She studies bilingualism and is the author of an upcoming book on this work.

If people speaking different languages need to group or observe things differently, then bilinguals ought to switch focus depending on the language they use. That’s exactly the case, according to Pavlenko.

For example, she says English distinguishes between cups and glasses, but in Russian, the difference between chashka (cup) andstakan (glass) is based on shape, not material.

Based on her research, she started teaching future language teachers how to help their English-speaking students group things in Russian. If English-speaking students of Russian had to sort cups and glasses into different piles, then re-sort into chashka andstakan, they should sort them differently. She says language teachers could do activities like this with their students instead of just memorizing words.

"They feel generally that this acknowledges something that they’ve long expected, long wanted to do but didn’t know how," Pavlenko says. "They felt that it moved them forward, away from teaching pronunciation and doing the ‘repeat after me’ activities."

Pavlenko points to research showing that if you’re hungry, you’ll pay more attention to food-related stimuli, and she says speaking another language fluently works the same way.

One’s native language could also affect memory, says Pavlenko. She points to novelist Vladimir Nabokov, who was fully trilingual in English, French and Russian. She says Nabokov wrote three memoirs: He published one in English, and when another publishing house asked for one in Russian, he accepted, thinking he would simply translate his first memoir.

"When Nabokov started translating it into Russian, he recalled a lot of things that he did not remember when he was writing it in English, and so in essence it became a somewhat different book," Pavlenko says. "It came out in Russian and he felt that in order to represent his childhood properly to his American readership, he had to produce a new version. So the version of Nabokov’s autobiography we know now is actually a third attempt, where he had to recall more things in Russian and then re-translate them from Russian back into English."

Boroditsky also studied the differences in what research subjects remembered when using English, which doesn’t always note the intent of an action, and Spanish, which does. This can lead to differences in how people remember what they saw, potentially important in eyewitness testimony, she says.

John McWhorter, a linguist at Columbia University, acknowledges such differences but says they don’t really matter. The experiments “show that there are these tiny differentials that you can find that seem to correlate with what language you speak,” McWhorter says. “Nothing has ever demonstrated that your language makes you process life in a different way. It just doesn’t work.”

As an example, he refers to modern speakers of a Mayan language, who also use directions that roughly correspond to compass points, rather than left or right. Researchers asked people, most of whom only knew this language, to do tasks like memorizing how a ball moved through a maze, which would have been easier had they thought about it in terms of left and right, rather than compass points. The participants were just as good at these tasks and sometimes better, leading the experimenters to conclude they were not constrained by their language.

Boroditsky disagrees. She says the counterexamples simply prove language isn’t the only factor affecting what we notice. Like studying to be a pilot or doctor, she says, learning to speak a different language fluently can also change us, and this means we can learn those changes, like learning any other skill.

"It’s like a very extensive training program," Boroditsky says. "There’s nothing exotic about the effects that language has on cognition. It’s just the same that any learning has on cognition."

(via science-junkie)

The estimated nightly homeless population in NYC rose from 13,000 to 52,000 in the last 20 years. … When I lived in NYC I tutored homeless folks: smart, motivated, cruelly unlucky, often abandoned by both family and society. More than I can count were left homeless by healthcare bills or kicked out of their houses for being queer.

We need systemic change, but in the meantime compassion will do. The homeless are human; when you see them, see them. I mean: be human too.

—A grounding, important, soul-stirring reminder from New York Magazine book critic Kathryn Schulz. Perhaps it’s time to revisit Susan Sontag’s 1972 new year’s resolution: "Kindness, kindness, kindness." (via explore-blog)

http://girlsmoocher.tumblr.com/post/71948809002/as-much-as-i-dislike-liberal-feminism-tm-and-the-way

girlsmoocher:

as much as i dislike Liberal Feminism and the way it promotes engagement with mainstream sexuality and gender roles as a method of “empowerment” and “subverting” patriarchal relations

i feel compelled to defend expressions of “traditional” femininity and the individuals who partake in it to the…

I am hesitant to say this, but even though I consider myself feminist and love to discuss it sometimes, it is not uncommon for contemporary discussions of feminism to focus in great detail on how to be a ‘good’ feminist, if that makes any sense… That has begun to seem hilarious to me though, because prescribing a correct approach to being empowered is in direct conflict to the idea of being empowered to begin with.

So yes, I love to bake, and yes I like heels and makeup, but my identity and worth isn’t based solely on these meaningless factors. The same goes for whether I choose to have kids, work an 80 hour a week job, or shave my head. These preferences don’t make me more feminist, or more feminine, or less, than anyone else… if that makes any sense… It just makes me a person who happens to like these things, or at least, I would hope that would be how most people see it. After all pink was a baby boy color, and high heels were worn by men about a hundred years ago. What is considered manly or feminine today will probably shift in the future as well. It isn’t a static phenomenon.

Thinking about this stuff is conflicting for me too sometimes. Like it shouldn’t be such a difficult topic, but it ends up being one anyways.

Anyway sorry for all the words. I ended up typing way more than I meant to. Happy new year too!

(Source: notyrgrl)

Be soft. Do not let the world make you hard. Do not let pain make you hate. Do not let the bitterness steal your sweetness.

—Kurt Vonnegut  (via excrutiate)

(via uhhleeese)